Inca Trail Tours Reimagined

Connect with local Peruvian travel experts who know their destination inside out to craft an Inca Trail tour to Machu Picchu exactly as you want it, stress-free.

Inca Trail Tours Reimagined​

Connect with local Peruvian travel experts who know their destination inside out to craft an Inca Trail tour to Machu Picchu exactly as you want it, stress-free.

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"To find the ultimate gems in a destination you are visiting was never easy. Until now. Baboo's in-destination experts are pure gold when you want to organize the trip of a lifetime."

Picture of Frits Meyst<br>National Geographic Journalist
Frits Meyst
National Geographic Journalist

“Baboo saves time and makes booking a custom trip easy as pie.”

“The greatest adventures on this planet, straight from the source.”

“Baboo tries to combat climate change by off-setting 110% of your travels carbon footprint.”

“Partnering with a local wingman in any destination is the best way to create the perfect tailor-made experience.”

“Baboo helps local communities by cutting out intermediates.”

Inca Trail Tours Reimagined (base)

“Baboo saves time and makes booking a custom trip easy as pie.”

“The greatest adventures on this planet, straight from the source.”

“Baboo tries to combat climate change by off-setting 110% of your travels carbon footprint.”

“Partnering with a local wingman in any destination is the best way to create the perfect tailor-made experience.”

Inca Trail Local Experts & Trip Ideas

Connect with a local expert who knows the Inca Trail and Peru inside out, to plan a stress-free custom-made trip. All of our local in-destination experts are hand-picked, highly experienced, licensed, and insured professionals, all driven by a commitment to creating outstanding trips for you.

Connect with an Inca Trail local expert to plan a stress-free custom trip with hand-picked, highly experienced, licensed and insured professionals driven by a passion for creating unforgettable trips.

Inca Trail Tours Reimagined (base)

Nicholas's
Team

☆ 4.5 (4 REVIEWS)

Why Choose Baboo

Reasons why travelers trust us to organize a stress-free custom Inca Trail tour to Machu Picchu, in Peru.

​Custom Trips Reimagined

Build a trip tailored to your needs while also helping to regenerate the earth.

Best-in-Class Local ​Travel Experts

​We connect you with curated, local​ experts to plan your dream trip.

​Stress-Free Travel Every Time

During your holiday, you will have access to 24/7 help and support.

Different Budgets Available

You will be able to create the tour that fits your needs, ranging from budget backpacker to higher end products.

 

Challenging & Educational

The treks are designed to help you challenge yourself and experience the Andean mountain like no other.

Sustainable Experiences

We are dedicated to providing local experiences that benefit the community and the environment.

Travel with Confidence, Travel Risk-free

At Baboo, we are devoted to ensuring that your return to travel following the pandemic is secure and risk-free.

  • Last minute Postponements with low fees.
  • Cancel 30 days prior to departure without fees.
  • Concierge service on the ground 24/7.
  • Travel like a local with a trip made by a local expert.

Hiking Trips to Machu Picchu

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Other Trending Inca Trail Alternatives

Experience the best of Machu Picchu with these 6 favorite adventures.

Frequently Asked Questions

Take a look at the most common Inca Trail to Machu Picchu FAQs below.

Permits on the Trek

Yes, everyone requires a permit, and our trips already include the permit, so you don't have to worry about it.

The Inca Trail has just 500 permits available daily for trekkers, porters, and guides, and they sell out quickly! Although permits are sometimes available within a few months of your vacation date, it's preferable to book at least 6 months in advance, especially during high season, which runs from May to September.

When you book an Inca Trail hike with us, the permit is immediately secured. Our Cuzco crew is prepared to book and collect permissions before to the commencement of your excursion.

Individuals are not permitted to purchase permits. Permits can only be purchased by licensed tour operators. Any company that desires to become a licensed operator must pass the Peruvian government's stringent annual application and inspection.

The first step is to make a reservation with us. Then, submit your current passport information precisely as it appears on the document (this should be the same passport with which you will be travelling). If you get a new passport between your booking date and your trip date, you must bring a copy of the old one with you to the Inca Trail Trek. Permits in Peru are immutable and non-transferable, which means that the dates cannot be amended and the name cannot be transferred to someone else.

Before your Inca Trail

The Inca Trail begins at Cuzco, Peru. You will take a shuttle from here to the start of the trip, which is 1.5 hours away by car. From there, you'll travel for four days to reach the sun gate, which leads to the breathtaking site of Machu Picchu.

No, in order to hike the Inca Trail, you must travel with a licensed tour operator that will provide you with guides, porters, chefs, and everything else you will need.

Yes, the Inca Trail is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to walk in the footsteps of the Incas along a commercial trade route that led to Machu Picchu. It's a strenuous 42-kilometer hike, but with a positive attitude and dedication, it's feasible for practically anyone in decent physical shape.

There is now just one Inca Trail trip to Machu Picchu, however when Inca Trail permits are unavailable, there are other wonderful alternative treks to Machu Picchu that do not follow the Inca Trail, including the Salkantay Trek, Inca Jungle Trek, Lares Trek, and Jungle Trek to Machu Picchu. There are various possibilities that might be a wonderful fit for your hiking tastes, depending on what you are looking for. The following are the primary characteristics:

Inca Trail: Follow along the footsteps of the Incas through breathtaking scenery, arriving in Machu Picchu at daybreak through the Sun Gate. You'll be camping for three nights.

Salkantay Trek: Possibly the most difficult of the treks, with breathtaking views of the Andean mountains and glaciers, culminating in Machu Picchu. Depending on the operator, you might spend one night in an Andean Hut, two nights in an Eco-dome, and one night in a hotel. Other possibilities include three nights camping and one night in a hotel in Aguascalientes.

Lares Trek: Stunning mountain views, travelling through local settlements to enjoy the native way of life, culminating in Machu Picchu. You will spend two nights camping and one night in a hotel in Aguascalientes.

Inca Jungle Trek: Mountain biking, rafting, a low-altitude jungle hike, zip-lining, and a visit to Machu Picchu are all part of the Inca Jungle Trek, a four-day adventure. This is ideal for thrill seekers looking for a less strenuous hike. Along the trip, you'll stay in basic accommodations.

Inca Quarry Trek: This is one of the newest additions to the alternative treks, taking you off the beaten road, through breathtaking landscape, and culminating in Machu Picchu. You'll be camping for three nights.

The Inca Trail has a total length of 42 kilometers. The Inca Trail is considered a moderate hike; there are numerous staircases to ascend, and the highest altitude reached is 4,200 meters. The effects of altitude on the body include dizziness and shortness of breath. To reduce knee strain, we recommend hiking with a walking stick.

The Inca Trail has a total length of 42 kilometers. The Inca Trail is considered a moderate hike; there are numerous staircases to ascend, and the highest altitude reached is 4,200 meters. The effects of altitude on the body include dizziness and shortness of breath. To reduce knee strain, we recommend hiking with a walking stick.

The hike will begin at a height of 2,800 meters (9,188 ft). The Dead Woman's Pass, at 4,200 meters, is the highest peak (17,785ft). For at least one of the nights, you will sleep at a height of 3,600 meters (11,820 feet).

Because everyone reacts differently to altitude, it's tough to forecast how you'll fare. Most of our hikers have no trouble as long as they take the time to properly acclimate. We recommend staying at least one full day, if not two, in Cuzco at 3,250 meters (10,660 feet) and drinking plenty of water every day. Many Cuzco residents drink coca tea or chew coca leaves to assist with altitude and claim that it works wonders.

May through September is considered the peak season for the Inca Trail, and permits are frequently required 6-8 months in advance. During the month of February, the Inca Trail is closed for renovation. The low season coincides with Cuzco's rainy season, which begins in October and ends in March. If a permit for the Inca Trail is not available, booking an alternate trip is an excellent option. Alternative treks are popular as much as or more than the Inca Trail.

May through September is considered the peak season for the Inca Trail, and permits are frequently required 6-8 months in advance. During the month of February, the Inca Trail is closed for renovation. The low season coincides with Cuzco's rainy season, which begins in October and ends in March. If a permit for the Inca Trail is not available, booking an alternate trip is an excellent option. Alternative treks are popular as much as or more than the Inca Trail.

To keep yourself dry and toasty, we always recommend wearing multiple layers of quick-drying materials such as wool or synthetic textiles. Bring a rain jacket or poncho to keep yourself dry. Having all of the different layers will assist you in dealing with the Pachamama's (mother nature's) abrupt variations in weather.

Hiking poles, rain pants, rain poncho, trekking boots, sandals, warm socks, sweaters, thermals, hat, gloves, sun hat, sun block, sun glasses, flashlight/torch, camera, extra batteries and memory card (limited to no electricity available during the trek), waterproof bags for your camera, hand sanitizer, personal first aid kit, water bottle Bring extra money for snacks, drinks, and gatorade, which can cost double or treble the price along the course.

During your Inca Trail

You will most likely arrive to Machu Picchu about 6:00 a.m., giving you plenty of time to see the incredible archaeological site. A two-hour guided tour of the site will be followed by an opportunity to explore on your own, snap some unforgettable images, and rest in the site till around midday. Due to Machu Picchu laws, we will need to leave the site after that time because there are more people coming in for the afternoon, and there is a restriction on the number of people that can come in each day.

After spending time at the breathtaking Machu Picchu, you will take a bus to Aguascalientes (30 minutes) to relax, eat lunch, and then take a wonderful train ride (1.5 hours) to Ollantaytambo (Sacred Valley). You will then board a bus back to Cuzco (1.5 hours).

The porters may or may not carry up to 5 pounds of your personal items, depending on the trek you selected. If this is not included in your trek, you can book it locally for a fee. For this, we equip you with a duffle bag that can hold 5 kg of your personal belongings and a sleeping bag. Our hardworking porters will transport this duffle bag for you on the Inca Trail, leaving you just only a tiny backpack to carry your water, camera, sunscreen, and snacks. Your large backpack or suitcase can be safely stored in the luggage area at your Cuzco hotel or in our office.

Most operators sleep two people in durable three-person tents, which are more spacious and comfortable. There are very few rural toilets along the trek, but the Inca Trail operator will set up temporary toilet tents for travelers.

The wonderful cuisine that our cooks make for your trekking days will astound you. Pasta or rice, chicken, fresh fruit and vegetables, eggs, and oatmeal are typical menu items. Our operators are pleased to accommodate any dietary restrictions or allergies you may have; simply let us know when you book your trip, and we will do our best to accommodate you.

We strongly advise you to bring a refillable aluminum water bottle because boiled water will be provided with each meal. Bottled water can be obtained on the first day of the walk and in several areas along the trail, however we strongly advise this owing to the waste it generates. You can also get a modern technology bottle that filters and cleans any water that it comes into contact with.

Yes, there are no issues. Walking sticks can also be rented in Cuzco for roughly $10-15 USD for the duration of the hike. We strongly recommend having one to relieve stress on your knees and maintain your balance.

Porters and Guides

Government restrictions limit the Inca Trail porters to carrying a maximum of 20kg on the treks. Our operators make certain that no porter is carrying more than this amount. They transport all of the camping equipment, food, and other camp necessities.

The porters sleep in tents with sleeping bags and foam mattresses provided. Some of the climbs have designated sleeping areas for the porters, and we pay all of the expenses for them to utilize these areas.

The porters typically hike much quicker than the rest of the party, and because they have very different dietary needs, they eat at different times of the day. We normally give them larger meal amounts and loads of carbs, so they can have more energy to meet their needs.

Every year, before the trekking season begins in March, our local operators conduct thorough training sessions for the porters to clear any misconceptions they may have. Porters typically work as third-party contractors on their own and have extensive past experience working in high-altitude mountainous places throughout the Andes. Many were born in remote Andean settlements and have spent their entire lives at high altitudes.

Porters and guides are the most vital aspects of the Inca Trail adventure. Our local partners supply them with the equipment they need to stay safe and comfortable on the walk. We outfit them with appropriate gear and equipment, such as a warm coat and rain jacket, a rain poncho, a back support, a sun hat, footwear, and a head lamp. Our personnel inspect the equipment on a regular basis to ensure that it is in good working order. We also provide health insurance for all of them and make every effort to respond to any medical problems or incidents involving porters on the Inca Trail as soon as possible.

It is ultimately up to you whether or not to tip your porters. It is common in Latin America, and especially on walks, to tip the porters at the end of the hike to thank them for their hard labor. We notice that trekkers are usually quite grateful to their porters and are willing to plan a brief ceremony at the conclusion of the journey to thank them in person and tip them. We normally recommend that your trekking group set up 6-8 dollars per person per day to tip the porter team. So, to budget ahead of time, figure on $24-$40 USD for tipping the porters at the end of the hike.

Let’s regenerate the planet together

We overcompensate your entire journey’s carbon footprint including flights – for free.

Get a dedicated team of local Peru experts working on your Machu Picchu trip today

Get a dedicated team of local Peru experts working on your Machu Picchu trip today